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el-dispute:

Woman Photographs Herself Receiving Strange Looks in Public

"I now reverse the gaze and record their reactions to me while I perform mundane tasks in public spaces. I seek out spaces that are visually interesting and geographically diverse. I try to place myself in compositions that contain feminine icons or advertisements. Otherwise, I position myself and the camera in a pool of people…and wait.

The images capture the gazer in a microsecond moment where they, for unknowable reasons, have a look on their face that questions my presence. Whether they are questioning my position in front of the lens or questioning my body size, the gazer appears to be visually troubled that I am in front of them.”

Photographer: Haley Morris-Cafiero | Project: Wait Watchers | Source

Posted at 11:14pm.

flyartproductions:

The persistence of Ms. Jackson

The Persistence of Memory (1931), Salvador Dali / Ms. Jackson, Outkast

Posted at 7:06pm.

flyartproductions:

The persistence of Ms. Jackson
The Persistence of Memory (1931), Salvador Dali / Ms. Jackson, Outkast

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

Posted at 7:05pm.

sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 
Jennifer duBois, Writing Across Gender (via feimineach)

Posted at 6:59pm.

I don’t think it’s terribly controversial to note that women, from a young age, are required to consider the reality of the opposite gender’s consciousness in a way that men aren’t. This isn’t to say that women don’t often misunderstand, mistreat, and stereotype men, both in literature and in life. But on a basic level, functioning in society requires that women register that men are fully conscious; it is not really possible for a woman to throw up her hands and write men off as eternally unknowable space aliens — and even if she says she has, she cannot really behave as though she has. Every element of her life — from reading books about boys and men to writing papers about the motivations of male characters to being attentive to her own safety to navigating most any institutional or professional or economic sphere — demands an ironclad familiarity with, and belief in, the idea that men really are fully human entities. And no matter how many men come to the same conclusions about women, the structure of society simply does not demand so strenuously that they do so. If you didn’t really deep down believe that women were, in general, exactly as conscious as you, you could probably still get by in life. You could probably still get a book deal. You could probably still get elected to office.

A Woman of War by Mehreen Kasana (via pbnpineapples)

this is so empowering! beautiful 

(via dirtyflowerchild)

Posted at 7:27pm.

As women, when we’re children we’re taught to enter the world with big hearts. Blooming hearts. Hearts bigger than our damn fists. We are taught to forgive - constantly - as opposed to what young boys are taught: Revenge, to get ‘even.’ Our empathy is constantly made appeals to, often demanded for. If we refuse to show kindness, we are reprimanded. We are not good women if we do not crush our bones to make more space for the world, if we do not spread our entire skin over rocks for others to tread on, if we do not kill ourselves in every meaning of the word in the process of making it cozy for everyone else. It is the heat generated by the burning of our bodies with which the world keeps warm. We are taught to sacrifice so much for so little. This is the general principle all over the world.

By the time we are young women, we are tired. Most of us are drained. Some of us enter a lock of silence because of that lethargy. Some of us lash out. When I think of that big, blooming heart we once had, it looks shriveled and worn out now. When I was teaching, I had a young student named Mariam. She was only 11 years old. Some boy pushed her around in class, called her names, broke her spirit for the day. We were sitting under a chestnut tree on a field trip and she asked me if a boy ever hurt me. I told her many did and I destroyed them one by one. I think that’s the first time she ever heard the word ‘destroyed.’ We rarely teach our girls to fight back for the right reasons.

Take up more space as a woman. Take up more time. Take your time. You are taught to hide, censor, move about without messing up decorum for a man’s comfort. Whether it’s said or not, you’re taught balance. Forget that. Displease. Disappoint. Destroy. Be loud, be righteous, be messy. Mess up and it’s fine – you are learning to unlearn. Do not see yourself like glass. Like you could get dirty and clean. You are flesh. You are not constant. You change. Society teaches women to maintain balance and that robs us of our volatility. Our mercurial hearts. Calm and chaos. Love only when needed; preserve otherwise.

Do not be a moth near the light; be the light itself. Do not let a man’s ocean-big ego swallow you up. Know what you want. Ask yourself first. Decide your own pace. Decide your own path. Be cruel when needed. Be gentle only when needed. Collapse and then re-construct. When someone says you are being obscene, say yes I am. When they say you are being wrong, say yes I am. When they say you are being selfish, say yes I am. Why shouldn’t I be? How do you expect a woman to stand on her two feet if you keep striking her at the ankles.

There are multiple lessons we must teach our young girls so that they render themselves their own pillars instead of keeping male approval as the focal point of their lives. It is so important to state your feelings of inconvenience as a woman. We are instructed to tailor ourselves and our discomfort - constantly told that we are ‘whining’ and ‘nagging’ and ‘complaining too much.’ That kind of silence is horribly violent, that kind of insistence upon uniformly nodding in agreement to your own despair, and smiling emptily so no man is ever uncomfortable around us. Male-entitlement dictates a woman’s silence. If we could see the mimetic model of the erasure of a woman’s voice, it would be an incredibly bloody sight.

On a breezy July night, my mother and I were sleeping under the open sky. Before dozing off, I told her that I think there is a special place in heaven where all wounded women bury their broken hearts and their hearts grow into trees that only give fruit to the good and poison to the bad. She smiled and said Ameen. Then she closed her eyes.

(Source: fullpollenbasket.com)

Posted at 7:25pm.

popthirdworld:

The Abbott Government is restricting the speech of the following:

- Academics: Academics can now have funding cut if Abbott Govt deems their work “ridiculous.” Normally, there is independence between politicians deeming which academic work is worthy of funding and which is not. What if an academic’s work is criticizing the Govt?

- Asylum Seekers: Asylum seekers shipped to offshore detention centres have little free speech – little access to talk to journalists or others who might allow them to be heard, no protections offered to those who speak up in the ‘Who killed Reza Barati?’ inquiry meaning many will self-censor etc. Further, funding for asylum seekers’ legal services has been cut, which has many impacts on asylum seekers ability to be heard - especially those who are behind detention walls who rely on their lawyer to ‘speak’ for them.

- Environmental protesters: The Abbott Govt has suggested they may ban secondary boycotts of unethical companies. Environmental groups’ right to such boycotts seems the specific target.

- Indigenous people: Abbott Govt will abolish “scores of statutory indigenous governance bodies”, which weakens Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s free speech on matters in their own communities. Further, funding to ATSI legal services has been cut which has various impacts on ATSI people’s ability to be heard.

- Journalists: Abbott considers it unacceptable for journalists to run stories that criticize the Navy, stating journalists should side with the ‘home team’ .

- Palestine protesters: Those who merely express support for the (non-violent!) BDS movement will have their funding cut. Even anti-BDS pro-Israel figures think this is going too far.

- Public Servants: Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet are disallowed from discussing their political views on social media, and must dob in colleagues if they disobey.

- Refugees: A new 'Code of Behaviour' limits refugees’ ability to protest/enjoy free speech in public settings.

- Social Media users: Department of Immigration threatened a refugee activist to take down a Facebook post on her wall criticising the Govt/ a specific public servant.

- West Papua protesters:  Abbott promised Indonesia that he would “do everything that we possibly can to discourage” West Papuan independence protesters.

NOTE: To be able to speak freely, we must have info on what our Govt is doing. Restricting access to info, however, has been a trend with the Abbott Govt. For example, media access to asylum seekers boats info has been cut severely. Abbott dismissed Australians’ right to know what our government is doing with regards to asylum seekers mere 'idle curiosity.’ Further, media access to ministers has become more difficult (PM’s office’s permission needed before any Minister speaks to media).

The Abbott Government is freeing the speech of the following:

- People who wish to offend others based on race: Abbott will scrap section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act, so it is now easier for people to offend others based on their race (even if doing so unreasonably or in bad faith).

Posted at 7:13pm.

(Source: giphy.com)

Posted at 1:57am and tagged with: art,.

(Source: anabsence)

Posted at 4:27am and tagged with: affirmation, embrace the absurd,.

yep this is a plant blog

(Source: fieldpapers.blogspot.fi)

Posted at 9:32am.

yep this is a plant blog