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A Woman of War by Mehreen Kasana (via pbnpineapples)

this is so empowering! beautiful 

(via dirtyflowerchild)

Posted at 7:27pm.

As women, when we’re children we’re taught to enter the world with big hearts. Blooming hearts. Hearts bigger than our damn fists. We are taught to forgive - constantly - as opposed to what young boys are taught: Revenge, to get ‘even.’ Our empathy is constantly made appeals to, often demanded for. If we refuse to show kindness, we are reprimanded. We are not good women if we do not crush our bones to make more space for the world, if we do not spread our entire skin over rocks for others to tread on, if we do not kill ourselves in every meaning of the word in the process of making it cozy for everyone else. It is the heat generated by the burning of our bodies with which the world keeps warm. We are taught to sacrifice so much for so little. This is the general principle all over the world.

By the time we are young women, we are tired. Most of us are drained. Some of us enter a lock of silence because of that lethargy. Some of us lash out. When I think of that big, blooming heart we once had, it looks shriveled and worn out now. When I was teaching, I had a young student named Mariam. She was only 11 years old. Some boy pushed her around in class, called her names, broke her spirit for the day. We were sitting under a chestnut tree on a field trip and she asked me if a boy ever hurt me. I told her many did and I destroyed them one by one. I think that’s the first time she ever heard the word ‘destroyed.’ We rarely teach our girls to fight back for the right reasons.

Take up more space as a woman. Take up more time. Take your time. You are taught to hide, censor, move about without messing up decorum for a man’s comfort. Whether it’s said or not, you’re taught balance. Forget that. Displease. Disappoint. Destroy. Be loud, be righteous, be messy. Mess up and it’s fine – you are learning to unlearn. Do not see yourself like glass. Like you could get dirty and clean. You are flesh. You are not constant. You change. Society teaches women to maintain balance and that robs us of our volatility. Our mercurial hearts. Calm and chaos. Love only when needed; preserve otherwise.

Do not be a moth near the light; be the light itself. Do not let a man’s ocean-big ego swallow you up. Know what you want. Ask yourself first. Decide your own pace. Decide your own path. Be cruel when needed. Be gentle only when needed. Collapse and then re-construct. When someone says you are being obscene, say yes I am. When they say you are being wrong, say yes I am. When they say you are being selfish, say yes I am. Why shouldn’t I be? How do you expect a woman to stand on her two feet if you keep striking her at the ankles.

There are multiple lessons we must teach our young girls so that they render themselves their own pillars instead of keeping male approval as the focal point of their lives. It is so important to state your feelings of inconvenience as a woman. We are instructed to tailor ourselves and our discomfort - constantly told that we are ‘whining’ and ‘nagging’ and ‘complaining too much.’ That kind of silence is horribly violent, that kind of insistence upon uniformly nodding in agreement to your own despair, and smiling emptily so no man is ever uncomfortable around us. Male-entitlement dictates a woman’s silence. If we could see the mimetic model of the erasure of a woman’s voice, it would be an incredibly bloody sight.

On a breezy July night, my mother and I were sleeping under the open sky. Before dozing off, I told her that I think there is a special place in heaven where all wounded women bury their broken hearts and their hearts grow into trees that only give fruit to the good and poison to the bad. She smiled and said Ameen. Then she closed her eyes.

(Source: fullpollenbasket.com)

Posted at 7:25pm.

popthirdworld:

The Abbott Government is restricting the speech of the following:

- Academics: Academics can now have funding cut if Abbott Govt deems their work “ridiculous.” Normally, there is independence between politicians deeming which academic work is worthy of funding and which is not. What if an academic’s work is criticizing the Govt?

- Asylum Seekers: Asylum seekers shipped to offshore detention centres have little free speech – little access to talk to journalists or others who might allow them to be heard, no protections offered to those who speak up in the ‘Who killed Reza Barati?’ inquiry meaning many will self-censor etc. Further, funding for asylum seekers’ legal services has been cut, which has many impacts on asylum seekers ability to be heard - especially those who are behind detention walls who rely on their lawyer to ‘speak’ for them.

- Environmental protesters: The Abbott Govt has suggested they may ban secondary boycotts of unethical companies. Environmental groups’ right to such boycotts seems the specific target.

- Indigenous people: Abbott Govt will abolish “scores of statutory indigenous governance bodies”, which weakens Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s free speech on matters in their own communities. Further, funding to ATSI legal services has been cut which has various impacts on ATSI people’s ability to be heard.

- Journalists: Abbott considers it unacceptable for journalists to run stories that criticize the Navy, stating journalists should side with the ‘home team’ .

- Palestine protesters: Those who merely express support for the (non-violent!) BDS movement will have their funding cut. Even anti-BDS pro-Israel figures think this is going too far.

- Public Servants: Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet are disallowed from discussing their political views on social media, and must dob in colleagues if they disobey.

- Refugees: A new 'Code of Behaviour' limits refugees’ ability to protest/enjoy free speech in public settings.

- Social Media users: Department of Immigration threatened a refugee activist to take down a Facebook post on her wall criticising the Govt/ a specific public servant.

- West Papua protesters:  Abbott promised Indonesia that he would “do everything that we possibly can to discourage” West Papuan independence protesters.

NOTE: To be able to speak freely, we must have info on what our Govt is doing. Restricting access to info, however, has been a trend with the Abbott Govt. For example, media access to asylum seekers boats info has been cut severely. Abbott dismissed Australians’ right to know what our government is doing with regards to asylum seekers mere 'idle curiosity.’ Further, media access to ministers has become more difficult (PM’s office’s permission needed before any Minister speaks to media).

The Abbott Government is freeing the speech of the following:

- People who wish to offend others based on race: Abbott will scrap section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act, so it is now easier for people to offend others based on their race (even if doing so unreasonably or in bad faith).

Posted at 7:13pm.

(Source: giphy.com)

Posted at 1:57am and tagged with: art,.

(Source: anabsence)

Posted at 4:27am and tagged with: affirmation, embrace the absurd,.

yep this is a plant blog

(Source: fieldpapers.blogspot.fi)

Posted at 9:32am.

yep this is a plant blog

gowns:

Refinery29 Asks Women: What Are the Things Every Woman Should Know Before She’s 30?

Thimali, 33: Married and divorced, emigrated from London to New York when she was 23

What she wishes she could go back and tell herself: Don’t do the things you think you should be doing — like be a doctor, get the postgraduate degree, or acquire the high-salary-paying job. Worry about it all less. If you have more fun, you could possibly even accomplish more. 

- Your 20s are for defining; your 30s are for refining. Your 20s come with the freedom to explore, the opportunity to push the boundaries of yourself, and the room to discover where all your extremes lie. Your 30s are for refining what you learned and uncovered in your 20s and bringing your dreams to fruition. 

- You can’t avoid the bad shit. It will always find its way to you somehow. 

- Look fear in the eye, and outsmart it. I wish I’d made this my number-one priority in my 20s. You can and should get advice from friends and strangers on how they do it, but your fears are your own, so the antidote will probably be your own, too. Dig deep and be brave. I know now that it’s impossible to be good at anything if you avoid challenges and never fail. A failure that gets its ass back up off the floor and tries again will not only be better prepared, but will always have the crowd on its feet in raucous applause. 

You haven’t got life figured out yet. Although it may feel like it, because life is hitting you like a thousand epiphanies slapping you in the face. And, you may never. But, if you do somehow find enlightenment, I imagine it will only be in the context of you. So, humble yourself and keep listening and learning. The wisest know they know nothing at all. 

- If you don’t know what you want to do with your life yet, do everything you love and do it hard. One of those things will surface as more important than the others. If after you’ve put in time, love, and energy, it still doesn’t feel right, you can always always change your mind. 

- I can guarantee there will be haters, but it’s only logic that there’ll be lovers, too.

- Don’t be afraid to ask for help. People want to help you. But, don’t arrive empty-handed — prove your interest by doing your research first.

- Not everyone you’re friends with are friends worth holding on to. Honor the friends that persist when you’re at your lowest. They are the absolute real deal. The rest aren’t bad people, but they aren’t helping you grow either. Don’t be afraid to let them go, and wish them a wonderful life as they exit yours. 

Other people’s views on life are not more relevant than your own. I don’t care if they’re older than you, better educated than you, wealthier than you, or shouting louder than you. Your perspective on planet Earth is exceptionally unique, and therefore your voice is equally as valid as anyone else’s. 

- Have fun learning about yourself, because “winning” is not growth. Not a sexy-looking résumé, not good hair and flawless skin, nor keeping to the same path as your parents. To be accomplished or successful is to be as honest with yourself as you can humanly manage. Getting to know all your flaws and all your attributes alike and accepting it all. From that point on, anything is possible.

Posted at 7:23pm.

gowns:

Refinery29 Asks Women: What Are the Things Every Woman Should Know Before She’s 30?
Thimali, 33: Married and divorced, emigrated from London to New York when she was 23
What she wishes she could go back and tell herself: Don’t do the things you think you should be doing — like be a doctor, get the postgraduate degree, or acquire the high-salary-paying job. Worry about it all less. If you have more fun, you could possibly even accomplish more. 
- Your 20s are for defining; your 30s are for refining. Your 20s come with the freedom to explore, the opportunity to push the boundaries of yourself, and the room to discover where all your extremes lie. Your 30s are for refining what you learned and uncovered in your 20s and bringing your dreams to fruition. 
- You can’t avoid the bad shit. It will always find its way to you somehow. 
- Look fear in the eye, and outsmart it. I wish I’d made this my number-one priority in my 20s. You can and should get advice from friends and strangers on how they do it, but your fears are your own, so the antidote will probably be your own, too. Dig deep and be brave. I know now that it’s impossible to be good at anything if you avoid challenges and never fail. A failure that gets its ass back up off the floor and tries again will not only be better prepared, but will always have the crowd on its feet in raucous applause. 
- You haven’t got life figured out yet. Although it may feel like it, because life is hitting you like a thousand epiphanies slapping you in the face. And, you may never. But, if you do somehow find enlightenment, I imagine it will only be in the context of you. So, humble yourself and keep listening and learning. The wisest know they know nothing at all. 
- If you don’t know what you want to do with your life yet, do everything you love and do it hard.  One of those things will surface as more important than the others. If after you’ve put in time, love, and energy, it still doesn’t feel right, you can always always change your mind. 
- I can guarantee there will be haters, but it’s only logic that there’ll be lovers, too.
- Don’t be afraid to ask for help. People want to help you. But, don’t arrive empty-handed — prove your interest by doing your research first.
- Not everyone you’re friends with are friends worth holding on to. Honor the friends that persist when you’re at your lowest. They are the absolute real deal. The rest aren’t bad people, but they aren’t helping you grow either. Don’t be afraid to let them go, and wish them a wonderful life as they exit yours. 
- Other people’s views on life are not more relevant than your own. I don’t care if they’re older than you, better educated than you, wealthier than you, or shouting louder than you. Your perspective on planet Earth is exceptionally unique, and therefore your voice is equally as valid as anyone else’s. 
- Have fun learning about yourself, because “winning” is not growth. Not a sexy-looking résumé, not good hair and flawless skin, nor keeping to the same path as your parents. To be accomplished or successful is to be as honest with yourself as you can humanly manage. Getting to know all your flaws and all your attributes alike and accepting it all. From that point on, anything is possible.

​lately I’ve been thinking about the rituals we resist and eventually come to embrace. I’m talking about political and creative subcultures, expat communities, hetero milestones, entering the corporate world — so much of it involves swallowing the language and wearing the right skin. we spend all this time struggling to earn the space we inhabit that we forget about all the other hats we might wear just as well. eventually you come to terms with what you have and don’t have, how you’re perceived and how to align this with the way you see yourself. anxiety paving the way for regret. it’s nice, I guess? reassuring? or insane/sad/inevitable. 

current preoccupations: natural fibres, education, the blue spine of skylights holding central station’s ceiling in place. nowadays I talk less and stride more. cultivate silence and action; intellectual discussions soon wear thin when you’re just trying to get through the work day. BUT feeling complicit with systems bothers me, it’s an itch I refuse to scratch

which explains my move towards speaking with hands — cooking for friends, resuming old knitting projects, hugging family, coaxing life from seeds. learn sign language during lunch breaks, take drumming dance workshops with anthropologists. work on your muscle memory to get out of your head — it muffles all thoughts about the places I could be in the world rather than here, right now, where I finally feel like I’m doing some good.

there are days where I forget what I look like. there are days when I make eye contact with someone who likes how I front but I’ve forgotten how to return the interest. here is the last ritual I’m learning to accept. I write this in an empty house, which is half metaphor and half truth. my good friends keep me humble. annie, who reads my tarot and sometimes my blog, reminds me to speak in affirmations, so here goes: thank you for your patience while I wandered in the wastelands. one day I’ll listen to your stories without judgement. we’ll make our way through the motions: I’ll accept your attention, I’ll accept your sincerity. we can do this. welcome home.

Posted at 9:25am and tagged with: clipse, no selfie zone,.

bell hooks in essay “feminist theory: a radical agenda”  (via sister-bell)

i’ve really come to hate how haphazardly this phrase is thrown around by the white left. white feminists. white radicals. white queers.

because most of you won’t even listen to POCs when we tell you how you’re complicit in upholding racism. how you dismiss our very valid experiences with racism if its not coated in fair trade organic powdered sugar.

so how is it you magically understand what the master’s tools are let alone where the house is?

(via navigatethestream)

Lol thats part of the masters tools, using poc work to scream down poc

(via strugglingtobeheard)

(Source: daniellemertina)

Posted at 6:50am.

When Audre Lorde made that much quoted yet often misunderstood cautionary statement warning us that “the master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house,” she was urging us to remember that we must engage in a process of visionary thinking that transcends the ways of knowing privileged by the oppressive powerful if we are to truly make revolutionary change. She was, in the deep structure of this statement, reminding us that it is easy for women and any exploited or oppressed group to become complicit in structures of domination, using power in ways that reinforce rather than challenge or change.