mostly a plant blog.
also politics, personhood, paradigm shifts
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blue1887:

every time i feel anxious i recall zadie smith’s words in white teeth about how no one deserves love all the time, that all we deserve is food, water, and shelter. i do not think she was calling for self-abasement but asking us to make our own way for ourselves, to expect from the world as much as we work to cull from it, and to take losses in stride as an inevitable portion of life’s offerings.

Posted at 2:32am and tagged with: one column,.

If you are female, expressing hatred for your own body is not just acceptable, it’s practically de rigeur. Failure to indulge in the requisite amount of self-flagellation – my thighs! my skin! my face! – isn’t just negligent, it’s unfeminine. Self-hatred is fundamental to how femininity is constructed, more fundamental than any of the more obvious external symbols (dress, make-up, shoes). What matters is not that you are beautiful, but you know your place in the beauty hierarchy (and since every woman ages, every woman’s place will eventually be somewhere at the bottom).

Young women are encouraged to bond over their dislike of excess body hair, surplus flesh and “uneven” skin. They are meant to do so in a jovial way, egged on by perky adverts informing them what “real women” do: worry about having underarms beautiful enough for a sleeveless top, celebrate curves with apologetic booty shakes and cackle ruefully over miserable Sex-and-the-City-style lunches of Ryvita and Dulcolax. It’s a gendered ritual; men get football and booze, women get control pants and detoxes. We are supposed, of course, to be grateful. Hey, you don’t have to be perfect! Just know you’re not perfect and act accordingly, with the appropriate levels of guilt and shame!

Fairy tale after fairy tale tells us that what matters is being beautiful “on the inside” but what does that really mean? It means submission, obedience and the suppression of one’s own desires. Don’t be haughty and proud. Clean the hearth. Kiss the frog. Love the beast. Suck it up when you’re replaced by a younger model. Sure, you may look fine, but you mustn’t feel fine. You mustn’t be vain. You mustn’t be angry. All fury and pain must be turned back on itself. That way you’ll be a real princess: silent, fragile and never threatening to challenge the status quo.

Posted at 9:20pm.

…the older I get, the more I see how women are described as having gone mad, when what they’ve actually become is knowledgeable and powerful and fucking furious.

(Source: ursaeyer)

Posted at 9:20pm.

(Source: garlicwhisper)

Posted at 9:16pm.

These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize.

(Source: z-saldana)

Posted at 8:40am.

tiny-steve:

Okay people, are you ready to freak out about this?

Abi Morgan, brilliant brilliant writer of The Hour has written this movie called Suffragette, about the early steps of feminist movement, that will feature an abundance of badass female characters fighting against oppression. No seriously, take a look at the official synopsis:

SUFFRAGETTE is a thrilling drama that tracks the story of the foot soldiers of the early feminist movement, women who were forced underground to pursue a dangerous game of cat and mouse with an increasingly brutal State. These women were not primarily from the genteel educated classes, they were working women who had seen peaceful protest achieve nothing. Radicalized and turning to violence as the only route to change, they were willing to lose everything in their fight for equality – their jobs, their homes, their children and their lives. MAUD was one such foot soldier. The story of her fight for dignity is as gripping and visceral as any thriller, it is also heart-breaking and inspirational. [x]
And no, I’m not done here. Lo and behold: the cast.
Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham-Carter, Meryl Streep (yes you heard me), Romola Garai, Anne-Marie Duff, Ben fucking Whishaw, Brendan Gleeson and Samuel West.
Oh, and yeah, it will also be directed by a woman, Sarah Gavron, who’s known for Brick Lane.
I’m generally careful with advanced praise but DO YOU HEAR THE SOUND OF FEMALE CAST AND CREW KICKING ASS.
Also those of you who haven’t seen The Hour yet, do. Because this woman knows how to write her female characters (and, coincidentally, her male ones as well. What a surprise.).
I’ll be in my corner waiting for early next year (which is when they said they’d release it, but there’s no actual date set so far).

Posted at 8:35am.

tiny-steve:

Okay people, are you ready to freak out about this?
Abi Morgan, brilliant brilliant writer of The Hour has written this movie called Suffragette, about the early steps of feminist movement, that will feature an abundance of badass female characters fighting against oppression. No seriously, take a look at the official synopsis:

SUFFRAGETTE is a thrilling drama that tracks the story of the foot soldiers of the early feminist movement, women who were forced underground to pursue a dangerous game of cat and mouse with an increasingly brutal State. These women were not primarily from the genteel educated classes, they were working women who had seen peaceful protest achieve nothing. Radicalized and turning to violence as the only route to change, they were willing to lose everything in their fight for equality – their jobs, their homes, their children and their lives. MAUD was one such foot soldier. The story of her fight for dignity is as gripping and visceral as any thriller, it is also heart-breaking and inspirational. [x]

And no, I’m not done here. Lo and behold: the cast.

Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham-Carter, Meryl Streep (yes you heard me), Romola Garai, Anne-Marie Duff, Ben fucking Whishaw, Brendan Gleeson and Samuel West.

Oh, and yeah, it will also be directed by a woman, Sarah Gavron, who’s known for Brick Lane.

I’m generally careful with advanced praise but DO YOU HEAR THE SOUND OF FEMALE CAST AND CREW KICKING ASS.

Also those of you who haven’t seen The Hour yet, do. Because this woman knows how to write her female characters (and, coincidentally, her male ones as well. What a surprise.).

I’ll be in my corner waiting for early next year (which is when they said they’d release it, but there’s no actual date set so far).

5centsapound:

Émilie Régnier: Mali Passport

via foam: ‘I am really driven by the idea of showing a West African society that is growing,’ says Régnier. That means ignoring the easy and the rote: pictures of elites quaffing champagne, or images cataloguing the atrocities of war. Witnessing with a camera takes many forms. For Régnier, photographic truth is located in the bodily presence of young West Africans proudly negotiating their future, a diverse future of many possibilities.’

Posted at 8:54pm.